Drum Corps World 1967 Legion/CYO DVD

Reminisce about your memories of those glorious days gone by

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Resume Hut
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Post by Resume Hut » Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:37 pm

frankiE wrote: " They Call the wind Maria"
Actually, they called that stiff breeze outta the West "Mariah", as in Carey, rather than "Maria", the girl I heard Tony just met in West Side Story. :wink: :nerd: :wink:
"These are the roots of rhythm and the roots of rhythm remain"-- Paul Simon

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frankiE
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Post by frankiE » Thu Jun 08, 2006 12:55 pm

i am not sure that you caught me on this?

the Thomas Edison movie studio was known as " The Black Maria"
( mariya pronunciation )

also you once mentioned you liked trains, the ALCO diesel demonstrators in the late 40's were known as " The Black Maria " ( mariya pronunciation)

here is the album listing for original cast recording



1. I'm On My Way Listen Listen Listen
2. Rumson Listen Listen Listen
3. What's Goin' On Here? Listen Listen Listen
4. I Talk To The Trees Listen Listen Listen
5. They Call The Wind Maria

Maybe phonetics has something to do with the Carey speak! :?:

I think this is a you say potato and i say potato thing

it is listed both ways in many different places!
Last edited by frankiE on Thu Jun 08, 2006 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mike
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Post by Mike » Thu Jun 08, 2006 1:02 pm

frankiE wrote:i am not sure that you caught me on this?
the Thomas Edison movie studio was known as " The Black Maria " ( mariya pronunciation )
Ever go there? Neat place. As a kid, we went there and they showed his first western..."The Great Train Robbery".

And no...when I went it wasn't Edison himself runing the projector! 8-)

...it was his dad....insert rimshot effect here

The Black Maria theater could actually rotate in order to get the best light source. Waay back it was actually open air.

Did you know that the film noted was shot in the great western wilds of Fort Lee, NJ? :D

Mike

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frankiE
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Post by frankiE » Thu Jun 08, 2006 1:07 pm

Mike wrote: Ever go there? Neat place. As a kid, we went there and they showed his first western..."The Great Train Robbery".


Mike
A great place to go, and then top off the day with an Italian Hot Dog at Jimmy Buff's! :D

Underneath the GW bridge in Fort Lee at the park is still relatively rural, and little else is left like that from the 60's!
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Post by Jazzman » Thu Jun 08, 2006 1:34 pm

frankiE wrote:[" They Call the wind Maria"

" Wandering Star "

" I talk to the trees "

You call that pretty lame music? :evil:
Actually, the music was like classic broadway. Perhaps, therein lies the problem, since some/many would say it didn't translate well to the big screen.

And who knew that Lee Marvin and Clint Eastwood could sing?
Of course, after this movie, we all knew they couldn't...

BTW, I thought it hilarious they would collect gold dust through the cracks in the saloon floor!
Regards, Jazzman

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Resume Hut
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Post by Resume Hut » Thu Jun 08, 2006 2:19 pm

frankiE wrote:i am not sure that you caught me on this?

here is the album listing for original cast recording

5. They Call The Wind Maria

I think this is a you say potato and i say potato thing

it is listed both ways in many different places!
Hey, you're right, frankiE, my bad. :oops: I just Google searched it both ways:
"They Call The Wind Maria"
"They Call The Wind Mariah"
and it pops the song and lyrics with both spellings.
"These are the roots of rhythm and the roots of rhythm remain"-- Paul Simon

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frankiE
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Post by frankiE » Thu Jun 08, 2006 3:44 pm

Jazzman wrote: BTW, I thought it hilarious they would collect gold dust through the cracks in the saloon floor!
That movie is a hoot! Lerner and Lowe provided a great Broadway production........... ( IMHO I loved the movie )

although I don't know what was in the Garfield medley ( busy driving apc's in 1970 ), I will cut my fellow Jerseyan some slack in hoping that one of the songs not played was " Hand me down that can of beans "!

:help:
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Post by FD » Fri Jun 09, 2006 8:03 am

Well, I do recall that Garfield had a clever bus song about beans, but it never made it into the show, though it was loaded with G.E.
It sounds like FrankiE and I have something in common. When the Army personnel officer asked what I did in civilian life I replied I was a trumpet player and would like to audition for the band. "Sorry", he said, "no openings right now, but would you like to work indoors?" "Yes, sir!", I answered, relieved that I would have a cushy desk job. "Fine", he said, "you're a tank driver."
Life had it's little surprises for drum corps kids in those days, and not all of them happened on the field.
"In my view.." is the implicit intro to all posts.

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frankiE
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Post by frankiE » Fri Jun 09, 2006 8:14 am

Before we start a war on the board, I have to clarify that I drove a treaded vehicle in the National Guard ( and some large oil tankers )
In 70 all my marching was called " forced " in the Jersey pine barrens!

One thing FD I'll never forget, is trying to drive an APC through the forest on a wintry night, ( no heat, little slit of a window fogged, head stuck out of the hatch hoping you don't crash)! It's like getting 100 needles in your face per second!

to be OT : I love this board and to see how corps has been such a positive factor in the lives of many! :D

that articulation in " The Joker " has had me amazed all these years.
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G-D vs G-F

Post by Jim Anello » Fri Jun 09, 2006 11:58 am

After listening to the last year of G-D hornlines on this DVD, I've come to the conclusion that the move to G-F horns in 1968 was one of the watershed events in drum corps history. The intonation on the 1968 hornlines just seems to be a whole lot better than on this DVD and other pre-1968 recordings.

FD and Frankie(and any others who care to chime in), what's your perspective on this?
Jim Anello

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frankiE
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Post by frankiE » Sat Jun 10, 2006 6:48 am

IMHO intonation has been getting better every year since then, including the teaching techniques used by today's brass instructors.

The tonality of today's hornlines is why I still enjoy drum corps, and volume on demand is still there, especially when you consider the hornlines are sixty plus rather than thirty plus.

One aspect of the time I really enjoy watching is the integration of the mellophone, some corps had french horns and mellophones. One gimmick you will see is two mellophones frequently out front of the rest of the horns. Also it seems the contra bass section would frequently be segmented with the drumline, away from the other horns.

I hope they put out more of these DVD's, it's a real time machine!
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Post by HNCadet » Sun Jun 11, 2006 9:51 pm

[quote="FD"]Sorry about missing my cue. I've been pre-occupied with grading my college students' semester accomplishments.

You mean you're not retired yet? Doesn't the Calif. JC system have a mandatory retirement age? I know from personal experience that one year of drum corps life is equivalent to 7 years of those normally disposed.

It's good to see you still have pleasant memories even with all the grief we provided.

It was wonderful to finally see and hear a DVD of that show in '67. It was one of only four really great performances we had that year. Talk about turnaround performances......at the AL's we finished in 8th place due to a 2 pt Flag Penalty that NEVER occured the entire season. Turns out we somehow either took longer steps in our company front in March Bravura OR our CG Capt halted the AM Flag section two steps early and the entire corp passed the AL Flag section.......OOPS!! We would have finished Fourth in the AL's too, Don Angelica tried in vain to get the Jr's expanded to eight corps since their were only four Seniors performing thereby having a full 12 corp show, but Nooooo. Our "espirit d'corp" was totally destroyed at that point UNTIL a day later when Jimmy D got Truman Crawford to come by and work the hornline for about 4hrs before the CYO's. That man was SO INSPIRATIONAL that the fire he lit under all of us infected the entire corp and the CYO show just.........happened. He only made a couple of small changes to the horn score, mostly phrasing and releases. I still remember the electricity that went thru the corp as we sang "HOLY NAME" and the "OUR FATHER" and that Jackie Gleason routine that Nicky R did ........everything went "right" that night........and finally I remember Jimmy D and Truman literally screaming and yelling "Great Job" as we were still playing our off the field number. It was surreal, but the bigger surprise came at retreat. They started off by announcing "In fifth place.......The Royal-Airs! We thought we had come in 8th again! but when they announced "In fourth Place....The Garfield Cadets" we stood at attention realizing that we finally beat Truman's primary corp for the first time since '63! and it wiped away a bit of the sting of losing three titles to them in '65 and the .05 loss at the '66AL Natl's. We were the only corp to compete against them and lose at all three Title shows in '65. and it was my last contest of '67(and against the RA's) as I headed off back to college the next day. Ahhh great memories from the "Phantom Squad" ........remember me now Frank? You were the last of the six great Horn Instuctors I had.........

Don Angelica, Hi Drietzer, Truman Crawford, Jimmy D., John Sasso and you! I had been so Blessed in my early life that I am now just realizing the impact all of you have had on me and my success's in life. Thank You!

BTW: I still believe that '77 show you did with Garfield is the MOST musically enjoyable 13 minutes in Drum Corp.(from MY perspective)

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Post by Blurae1 » Mon Jun 12, 2006 5:56 am

Ever watch that very old program "What's My Line" with John Daly, Bennett Cerf, Arlene Francis, Dorothy Killgallen etc. That's what I feel like now trying to gues who the posters are & what they did. I guess I don't have a very good grasp of the DC history..............Bill

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Post by Brian Tolzmann » Mon Jun 12, 2006 6:34 am

HNCadet wrote: BTW: I still believe that '77 show you did with Garfield is the MOST musically enjoyable 13 minutes in Drum Corp.(from MY perspective)
The 1977 Garfield Cadets were AMAZING! And despite their 12th place at DCI prelims, their brass scores showed how outstanding their book was........3rd in musical analysis and 4th in GE brass.

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Post by Jim Anello » Mon Jun 12, 2006 7:32 am

Brian Tolzmann wrote:
HNCadet wrote: BTW: I still believe that '77 show you did with Garfield is the MOST musically enjoyable 13 minutes in Drum Corp.(from MY perspective)
The 1977 Garfield Cadets were AMAZING! And despite their 12th place at DCI prelims, their brass scores showed how outstanding their book was........3rd in musical analysis and 4th in GE brass.
What they did on the field was great. I remember the anticipation BEFORE they started their show - while they were in warmups. Remember that opening statement from Star Wars that they always played? The crowd always went nuts!

Watching them do a run through on some blacktop in Whitewater with my brothers is one of my fonder drum corps memories. They played against the wall of a dorm. We hoisted my youngest brother on the overhang of a 1st floor doorway so he could soak it all up. Gosh, that was fun!
Jim Anello

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