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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 6:52 pm 
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TrumpetGuy05 wrote:
Any tips for upper range playing?


If you haven't seen it yet, there's a book out there called "Double High C In Sixty Days" or something like that.

Probably half of the book is spent below -- sometimes way, way below -- the staff. You'll be counting as many ledger lines down there as you would above the staff.

That, and, "Keep working at it", are the only tips I've got. Just don't hurt yourself, and always strive for a great sound.


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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 6:58 pm 
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Location: Kalamazoo, MI...for 2 more weeks!
I'm in the same boat with the mouthpieces. I prefer using a big mouthpiece, but I was put in some sticky situations when I marched and didn't want to play the guessing game when it came to endurance, flexibility or relying on others to play when I took a break. I could've used the CG3 in 2001, but that Warburton was tried and true so I went with it all summer and felt so comfortable, well as comfortable as a mouthpiece can feel playing that show. The Warburton really helped a ton.

Regardless of mouthpiece choice, PM me if you are interested in some excercises I picked up in college that helped me develop endurance and lip flexibility, or you can e-mail me at:

drew.ross@mac.com

Its concert week for my school, so I'm pretty busy all day but I'd be happy to help you out...I think I have some of the excercies in .pdf format.

http://www.warburton-usa.com/catalog-trumpet.htm <---shameless plug!!!

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Drew Ross
1997-1998 Tarheel Sun Soprano
1999-2001 Crossmen Soprano
2002 Crossmen Brass Staff


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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2004 5:39 pm 
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Thanks for the info. Usually I go the harder route really, I remember when I first got the 1, I could barely play on it. Now, it isn't that bad (I can pull a 6-8 hour hour rehearsal, on a good day.) I'll look into those Warburtons though, I had one briefly, I think it was a 10M, but I found it too small for my liking. I'll check out the size you suggested.

Thanks.

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:32 pm 
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By the way, what is a good range for a trumpet of my age (going into my senior year)? I'm pretty solid up to the second G over the staff, and can even get out an A or two usually (all-time highest notes were a string of double EE's). I know that all of the BD and Crossmen sops/trumpets were able to bust out CC's since before they could walk, so I'm not trying to brag, but I was just curious. Thanks.

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:44 pm 
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Your range is fine.

Listen to how high, say, Phantom plays, too. They're way up there.

One of the only real screamer sops I heard in '99 was a guy in Jersey Surf. Any corps, by itself, is not automatically populated by screamer sop players.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2004 7:48 pm 
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True enough, but some corps do seem to attract more screamers than others. And I think I heard that same sop from Surf in 2000, had a solo I believe in Carmen.

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 19, 2004 4:31 am 
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Yeah, corps attract a certain style of player, but the writing & music style gives the illusion of a whole screaming sop section, too.

I just hear people too often thinking that just because someone marched in, say, BD's or Scouts' sop line, they must be triple-octave gods, when that's just not the case.


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 Post subject: only two principles neccessary
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2004 2:04 pm 
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can you say "yes sir."? can you follow through on your "yes sir."?

if you answered yes to both of those... then you are exactly what any drumcorps is looking for. conform to the opinion of the instructors... adopt the will of the entire group... and above all other things,

forget yourself... and leave ego at your home doorstep.

If that sounds like your cup of tea, then you are ready to go. Your ability will result from your willingness to learn EVERYTHING all over again... exactly the way Corps X wants you to. Right down to manipulating the equipment; beit the horn or the mouthpiece that they slap in your horn for you. Trust everybody but yourself :) ... and don't forget to have fun doing it!!!!!!!!

Corps are ALWAYS quick to take the ones that care less about themselves and more about how their personal performance is effecting everyone around them.
That kind of person is usually the most teachable and then best suited for quick success.

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Nothing is too difficult... only time consuming.


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 Post subject: Re: only two principles neccessary
PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2004 6:29 pm 
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CFI BLOOO wrote:
Corps are ALWAYS quick to take the ones that care less about themselves and more about how their personal performance is effecting everyone around them.
That kind of person is usually the most teachable and then best suited for quick success.


Absolutely. A player is worthless to the corps if he or she is damaging the ensemble's sound by being stubborn. It's just as bad as having no skill.

Welcome to the world of ensemble musicianship, where nobody cares what you can do individually, but cares a great deal about the sound of the group. I had very little patience with kids who refused to become part of the hornline's sound.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 20, 2004 7:23 pm 
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I understand about ensemble playing (I apologize for sounding beligerent/arrogant, I didn't mean it to come off that way). I've heard some great groups but every now and then Joe/Josephine (lol) Hero will rear their ugly head by trying to plaster their bell onto the pressbox.
And I suppose arranging can make notes seem higher (mello, mid-range playing with a sudden high C for instance). I'm not very well versed in earlier drum corps, but Phantom does this at times (then, other times the sops/trumpets will just play high for what seems like ever). Actually, I do recall a recording of Amazing Grace by Phantom, some guy/girl(s) started wailin out the melody, quite impressive.

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2004 7:06 pm 
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Out of curiosity, and I know I ask about this too much, but what kinda of range might I need were I to march lead trumpet/sop for Crown?

Thanks

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2004 7:40 pm 
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*sigh*

Yeah, you're a trumpet player, that's for sure.


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 Post subject: What you REALLY need
PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2004 11:43 pm 
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Hey, trumpetguy, I'm a trumpet guy, too, so I understand what you're thinking: "I've gotta be able to play a certain range/have certain trumpet-playing abilities to play lead in a competitive Division I drum and bugle corps. What range/abilities do I need?"

STOP ! This is the wrong line of thinking, despite what may seem reasonable at first glance. If we can believe what you've posted so far, then range/ability isn't an issue for you. To answer your REAL question (which is "What do I need to do to get into a competitive Div. I drum and bugle corps?"), look to CFI and Leland:

Leland wrote:
CFI BLOOO wrote:
Corps are ALWAYS quick to take the ones that care less about themselves and more about how their personal performance is effecting everyone around them.
That kind of person is usually the most teachable and then best suited for quick success.

Absolutely. A player is worthless to the corps if he or she is damaging the ensemble's sound by being stubborn. It's just as bad as having no skill.

Welcome to the world of ensemble musicianship, where nobody cares what you can do individually, but cares a great deal about the sound of the group. I had very little patience with kids who refused to become part of the hornline's sound.

So you see, it's not about how high or long or loud you can play, dude. Not at all, not in any way. When I marched, I had the capability to play the split part with some ease, and the lead part with some work. But at age 15 my first year, I had no corps experience and only one year of marchng band, so I ended up on the second part.

I stayed there the next two years as well, not because I couldn't handle the other parts, but because that's where they needed me to play to fill out the section's sound. We had a fair number of woodwinds marching soprano, and most of them didn't have ANY range OR experience, so naturally they had to play 2nd. Unfortunately, that left all the chops up on the top two parts, so I and a couple of others moved back down to second to keep our line from being top-heavy. It's not like I didn't have to work hard to keep up my end of things, and no one said or implied or treated me like I was less of a Crossmen for having marched a lower part.

If you go to a corps, and the staff says "We need you on the 8th soprano/trumpet part," and you aren't willing to take it, you're up a creek. You need to understand that many Div. I corps only march ~4-6 lead spots TOTAL in a line of 18-25, and those are often reserved for vets who've already proven themselves in previous seasons.

Listen: the staff of the corps you go to the first time will HEAR your abilities when you play, whether during auditions or during the early rehearsals. They can tell who's missing notes and who can handle the range and who's still got chops four hours into the rehearsal block. That's what they get paid for, after all. Your claimed abilities put you well into the group that will make it past the initial cuts, but they also know that even mediocre players that work hard every day and on their own time will improve dramatically over the course of the season.

What they can't tell from auditions is who is going to BE that hard worker, and who is going to be content with what they've already got, only to be dragging the hornline back in August when they were out front in May. They need to know who can hack it on the road in the dog days of July when you feel like you've been on tour forever, you feel like you've got forever left to go, and will you all please take this one stupid part back to the beginning for the eighteenth time.

WHAT YOU NEED TO DO is to:
1)go to every camp (and for crying out loud let them know when you're going to miss one and why and you'd better have a good reason!),
2)listen to every word spoken by the staff,
3)keep your own mouth shut (except to ask pertinent questions at appropriate times),
4)do everything they ask you to do (without grousing!),
5)and get better every time they see you.

Be the best worker bee that you can, and your chance in the DCI spotlight will come.

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SPC Dave Ballard
Crossmen '87 - ' 89


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 23, 2004 11:24 pm 
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I understand what you're saying and have been in that position before (put on a lower part despite being able to play first/lead/whatever). If I were to make a corps, I wouldn't care where they put me really, as long as it was somewhere on the line.
As a sidenote, there was a "Music is Cool" clinic at my school yesterday (I'm sure the corps members were thrilled about that, sarcasm lol) so I got to see a bit of how a Crossmen rehearsal goes (btw, they are on fire this year.) I've seen tapes (and heard horror stories) about rehearsals, but it has a different feel when you're watching it in person.


To change subjects a bit, has anyone else seen the Crossmen this year?

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2004 8:34 pm 
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No feedback? Surprising.

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Carolina Crown, Trumpet 05-06'
UNC Medical School 09-Whenever


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