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Highest Note for DCI?

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2004 11:13 am
by Malibu
Anyone know the year, corps and the highest note on record in DCI? :hum:

Posted: Thu Oct 28, 2004 8:11 pm
by TrumpetGuy05
Assuming you mean on trumpet, I've heard there was a triple C in 74 Madison Scouts, haven't heard it yet myself though. Double C's are here and there, I think there was one in 94 BD. Also, whatever ungodly high note BD's soloist played the last two years has got to be up there too. A FF maybe.

Posted: Fri Oct 29, 2004 5:21 am
by Malibu
Yeah, sop or trumpet, but not limited to either. :wink:

Maybe FD would know the answer.

Posted: Fri Oct 29, 2004 10:41 am
by energy87
1980 North Star
1983 Madison
both these had E above double C
1982Garfield
1986 Madison
These two had F above double C

Posted: Fri Oct 29, 2004 3:32 pm
by Leland
89 Florida Wave, although unwritten, had one of their two screamers (not the one that went to do solos in BD the next year, either) on a G above that F that Morgan played in '86 Scouts. It's on the quarterfinals video.

'91 Railmen had Bill Trulove playing an F# in that register as well at the end of the ballad, although he didn't play it every time.

What made Morgan's triple F so cool in '86 Scouts was that he nailed it every time, in rehearsal and in performance.

Posted: Sun Oct 31, 2004 5:27 pm
by 1stMello God
How do these people get such monster chops?!?! Triple C!!!! Holy Cow!

Posted: Sun Oct 31, 2004 6:32 pm
by Leland
Well, I don't have any advice, but my friend Bill said that his trumpet section back in high school was loaded with Maynard fans. They all tried playing high all of the time, and it just carried over in the years afterward. I believe that one of their tools may have been the "Double High C In 60 Days" trumpet book (or whatever it's called).

He was Railmen's screamer guy from '88 through his ageout year in '91, then made it back on the field in '94 for Railmen Sr. and Empire Statesmen (he was the one taking the melody up an octave in the "Lady Is A Tramp" hit after the drum solo, for example).

Anyway, that's one example.

Posted: Sun Oct 31, 2004 10:30 pm
by FD
As a performer, I just wanted to be the guy with the good tone, but was often called upon to play the "high" parts. (Note parentheses.)
Back in the '60s, "G" above high "C" was screamer land. When Peewee played an "A" at the end of the Skyliner's "Flight of the Bumble Bee" and Frank Diliberto did likewise in his Sunriser solo in "Ballin' the Jack", the bar was raised. There's a legendary double "C" at the end of St. Kevin's "Stars and Stripes" ('64 Dream recording) and another from Canada's Marching Ambassadors soloist on the B-side of that Skyliners LP from 1963 or so. Both John Sasso and Billy Hightower had "Double C's" on French horn and Baritone, respectively, for the Queensmen on the 1961 "Brass by Night " album.
These notes are all the more remarkable when one considers the instruments on which they were played (single piston G/D's).
For reference sake, the highest note in last summer's BD show appears to be a "Double C", played on a Bb horn, therefore a concert Bb, or the equivalent of a "Double Eb" on the G bugle.
High is cool. High and in tune with good quality is music.

Posted: Tue Nov 02, 2004 11:46 am
by XarrangerX
FD wrote:.
High is cool. High and in tune with good quality is music.



Yes. . . and then there is. . . Roy Roman. . .

:shock: :shock: :shock:

Chuck Naffier

highest notes

Posted: Fri Dec 10, 2004 5:01 pm
by cavies79
I don't know if these were the highest notes, but here are some memorable soloists from days gone by (on soprano):

1979/ 80 North Star soprano soloist

1979 Madison (Fred?)

1980 Blue Devils

1985 Madison

1979 Guardsmen (during Tiger of San Pedro)

1978 Madison (during Malaguena)

1974 Muchachos


I'm sure there have been many since and before. What was truly remarkable was how the soloists of those days would go for playing in the extreme upper range. You don't hear that today. Today's players are more technical, but really no screamers. :(

Posted: Mon Dec 13, 2004 6:50 pm
by TrumpetGuy05
95 Scouts (Malaga), 94 Devs, 01 Scouts (four great high range players), and 02-04 BD come to mind.

Posted: Tue Dec 14, 2004 5:18 pm
by Dan Kelly
Got to include the Bridgemen's soloist from the mid-70's on in there. For range and being clean, he was very good.
Dan Kelly

Harpo

Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2005 11:07 am
by Old School
I am not a brass guy but there was a member of the Colts in the early 80's that the fans called "Harpo". I don't know how high he got , but he was a memorable screecher. Also when I marched in Madison the Kilties had a sop that could get up there. I think that was 74 or 75.

O.S.

Re: Harpo

Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2005 8:28 pm
by Jim Anello
Old School wrote:I am not a brass guy but there was a member of the Colts in the early 80's that the fans called "Harpo". I don't know how high he got , but he was a memorable screecher. Also when I marched in Madison the Kilties had a sop that could get up there. I think that was 74 or 75.

O.S.


That Kiltie soprano was Tom Meredith, also known as "Fat Tom." He was a local kid from Racine Horlick High School who was in the corps from 1973-1977. He still lives in the Racine area, and I believe he runs a funeral home that has been a family business for years.

Posted: Wed Jan 12, 2005 6:34 am
by Jd
Don't forget the Bridgemen 1978 soloist at the end of "Harlem Nocturne".