Awesome Brass Arranging

Discussion topics covering the brass player's experiences and needs

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Hostrauser
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Awesome Brass Arranging

Post by Hostrauser » Sat Jul 06, 2002 10:33 pm

Just a random thought, feel free to comment on it...

The other day I was listening to Phantom 1996 for the first time in several months. Yes, the horn-line was awesome, saying that is simply restating the obvious. What impressed me most while listening was how good the horn arrangements were.

I mean, I know Jim Wren is the man, but come on. That Fourth Ballet Suite intro is (IMO) the best brass arrangement in DCI history (which for me only goes back to about the mid 80s, so settle down).

Any pieces you want to add? The ones that give you goosebumps not just because they're performed so well, but because they're written so far above the norm.
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Post by CrownSoprano2000 » Sat Jul 06, 2002 10:48 pm

In 2000, my former HS played an almost adentical arrangement to that show. Yes, an awesome arrangement.
Kevin Jay Smith. Camden/Columbia, South Carolina.
Music Education Major, University of South Carolina.
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Post by CrownSoprano2000 » Sat Jul 06, 2002 10:52 pm

And speaking of arranging stuff, I spent a while today, and I just finished arranging a brass warmup chorale to use this season when I am teaching. It's really cool. It's from the old Legend of Zelda theme song, which I have always thought would make an awesome ballad.
Kevin Jay Smith. Camden/Columbia, South Carolina.
Music Education Major, University of South Carolina.
http://www.urbancolumbia.com

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Post by LAMystreaux » Sun Jul 07, 2002 5:58 am

CrownSoprano2000 wrote:And speaking of arranging stuff, I spent a while today, and I just finished arranging a brass warmup chorale to use this season when I am teaching. It's really cool. It's from the old Legend of Zelda theme song, which I have always thought would make an awesome ballad.



Hhhhhhhhmmm, care to share? :wink:
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Post by CrownSoprano2000 » Sun Jul 07, 2002 10:12 am

Yeah, let me convert it to a midi. It's still a rough draft, and some of the tuba is out of range I think, since I am not experienced enough. Feel free to tweak the mess out of it and post it again.

If I forget to do that, just remind me and bug me until I do.
Kevin Jay Smith. Camden/Columbia, South Carolina.
Music Education Major, University of South Carolina.
http://www.urbancolumbia.com

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Post by LAMystreaux » Sun Jul 07, 2002 10:42 am

Cool! Thanks! IM me sometime if you wanna send it through email.
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Tuba Range

Post by Hostrauser » Sun Jul 07, 2002 6:28 pm

What luck, there's a tuba player here to help you. :D

The tuba's a pretty flexible instrument with a hell of a range. You can feel safe covering about two octaves with the tuba: from low F four ledger lines below the bass clef staff up to the middle F on the second line down from the top of the staff.

This is by no means the limit of the Tuba's range, merely a reasonable range that any competent High School level (or above) performer should be able to play comfortably.

And, generally, faster passages are easiest in the middle of this range, around the bottom of the bass clef staff. But the tuba is a lot more nimble than some people give it credit for. It will handle fast passages better than most trombones and french horns.

Feel free to ask more questions if you want. As long as you aren't writing nothing but whole notes for the tubas, I'll be glad to help. :lol:

-Kevin Pogue
(former tuba/euphonium performer and amateur composer)
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Post by CrownSoprano2000 » Sun Jul 07, 2002 9:51 pm

Well, thanks. There are several whole notes for everyone, and it's a slow piece, but the bass part is not all whole notes. It's probably the right balance between sustain and movement, although it could probably use more movement. But I also haven't taken any composition or arranging classes yet.
Kevin Jay Smith. Camden/Columbia, South Carolina.
Music Education Major, University of South Carolina.
http://www.urbancolumbia.com

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So?

Post by Hostrauser » Sun Jul 07, 2002 10:54 pm

That's okay, neither have I. :oops: I'm a largely self-taught composer. I've got a ton of scores (Shostakovich, Stravinsky, Mozart, Tchaikovsky) that I study and try to learn from (those guys obviously knew what they were doing). I've managed to get by okay with just a few theory classes and my "Bible" (Rimsky-Korsakov's "Principles of Orchestration"). 8)
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Oh, wait...

Post by Hostrauser » Sun Jul 07, 2002 10:55 pm

My point was: don't let lack of education or training stop you. :)
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downey

Post by CFI BLOOO » Sat Jul 13, 2002 2:06 pm

i'll have to go with the downey arrangements on this one... wayne downey has supplied the drumcorps world with the most sophisticated and seemless arrangements to date (my opinion of course). his uses of innovative voicings and "interplay" exceed 'transcription'... they are TRUE arrangements... new compositions on old themes. very solid writing (so solid in fact, that it is the LAST thing that you think about when you hear his works). my favorite downey works are BD 93, 95, !!!96!!!, 97, (not a very good SHOW... but thoughtfully arranged) 98, and i love the arranging in 2000 music of bernard hermann. when i listen to the orriginal works and compare them to the drumcorps idom works i have to laugh when i find the motives mixed up and interplayed from segment to segment (with genius)... downey truly knows the art of "originality in arranging".
Nothing is too difficult... only time consuming.

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Downey, Prime, and others

Post by cavies79 » Sat Aug 03, 2002 3:38 pm

I have to agree that Wayne is definitely the man. Consistancy is the word. Every year he arranges great brass selections. I also have to put Jim Prime in that catagory. His work for both Garfield and Star are exceptional. My favorite is the 91 show (Respighi) with those great mello runs.

Others we have to consider are:

Michael Klesch- Cadets/ Colts/ Phantom
Gordon Henderson- SCV
Jim Ott- Spirit
Larry Kerschner- Bridgemen & others
Jay Bocook- Cadets
Jim Wren- Phantom
Tim Salzman- Cavies/ Guardsmen
Robert W. Smith- Suncoast Sound/ Spirit/ Magic

New guys to listen to are:

Richard Saucedo- Cavies
JD Shaw- Phantom
Dean Westman- SCV
Scott Boema- Madison

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Post by Hostrauser » Sat Aug 03, 2002 6:52 pm

Saucedo still doesn't do much for me. I'd add Chuck Naffier to that list, too. Got give the love to a fellow Sound Machine poster. :D Seriously, though, his work would make it on its own merits. I still love the stuff he wrote for the Colts back in the mid-90s.
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Saucedo

Post by cavies79 » Sat Aug 03, 2002 8:52 pm

We all have our own opinions, but I feel that R. Saucedo is a very good writer. He also writes excellent band compositions and arrangements for Warner Brothers. He also has one of the best marching bands in the country. Since he started writing for the Cavies, there brass scores have been climbing to the top. And, to write original material takes a lot of talent.

I agree Chuck N is a good writer, too.

:D

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Post by Hostrauser » Sat Aug 03, 2002 8:58 pm

Yeah, Carmel HS has been doing well the past few years. No arguments as to his skill, he's obviously far better at writing music than I am. I'm just saying his music doesn't *do it* for me, not that there's anything wrong with it.
"I hate mankind, for I think myself one of the best of them, and I know how bad I am."
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